Last edited by Mikarisar
Tuesday, May 19, 2020 | History

4 edition of Understanding Jewish Mysticism found in the catalog.

Understanding Jewish Mysticism

The Philosophical-Mystical Tradition and the Hasidic Tradition (The Library of Judaic Learning)

by David R. Blumenthal

  • 267 Want to read
  • 5 Currently reading

Published by Ktav Pub Inc .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Judaism,
  • Mysticism,
  • Jewish Mysticism,
  • Religion,
  • Cabala

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8344440M
    ISBN 100870682059
    ISBN 109780870682056

      Understanding the Blood of Jesus Decem Richard Murray Patheos Explore the world's faith through different perspectives on religion and spirituality! "As the Zohar is the canonical text of the Kabbalah, so, in a sense, is Scholem's Major Trends the canonical modern work on the nature and history of Jewish mysticism. For a sophisticated understanding, not only of the dynamics of Jewish mysticism, but of the exquisite complexities of Jewish history and tradition, Major Trends is a major port Pages:

    Constructions of Jewish Culture and Identity (New Perspectives on Jewish Studies) Prayer of the Heart in Christian and Sufi Mysticism The Religious Thought of Hasidism: Text and Commentary (Sources and Studies in Kabbalah, Hasidism, and Jewish Thought, V. 4) The Horizontal Society: Understanding the Covenant and Alphabetic Judaism (Vol.   The Zohar is the crowning peak of Jewish mysticism, and is in many senses the cornerstone of kabbala – the place from which it emanates and to which it returns. The depth of its conceptual, psychological and religious ideas, which arise from its splendid homilies and from its dynamic stories, have made the Zohar one of the pillars of Jewish.

    A brief survey of the afterlife beliefs in Judaism is presented here. A Brief Survey of Jewish Afterlife Beliefs. The core of Judaism is a covenant relationship - which is both a contractual agreement and a "marriage" of love - between Yahweh and his chosen people. Because Judaism is built around a relationship involving agreements and promises. Book Description. Providing a unique anthropological perspective on Jewish mysticism and magic, this book is a study of Jewish rites and rituals and how the analysis of early literature provides the roots for understanding religious practices.


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Understanding Jewish Mysticism by David R. Blumenthal Download PDF EPUB FB2

Understanding Jewish Mysticism book. Read 2 reviews from the world's largest community for readers/5. Understanding Jewish Mysticism: A Source Reader: The Merkabah Tradition and the Zoharic Tradition (The Library of Judaic learning) [Blumenthal, David R.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Understanding Jewish Mysticism: A Source Reader: The Merkabah Tradition and the Zoharic Tradition (The Library of Judaic learning)Cited by: The Zohar (Hebrew: זֹהַר, lit."Splendor" or "Radiance") is the foundational work in the literature of Jewish mystical thought known as Kabbalah.

It is a group of books including commentary on the mystical aspects of the Torah (the five books of Moses) and scriptural interpretations as well as material on mysticism, mythical cosmogony, and mystical psychology.

photo courtesy: Ann Borden, Emory University. David R. Blumenthal Jay and Leslie Cohen Professor of Judaic Studies, retired. Professor Blumenthal did path-breaking work in medieval intellectual Jewish history with his early studies in Yemenite philosophy, his two-volume textbook on Jewish mysticism (Understanding Jewish Mysticism), and his later work that established.

Understanding Jewish Mysticism: A Source Reader, Volume II by David R. Blumenthal (Author) ISBN ISBN Why is ISBN important. ISBN. This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book.

The digit and digit formats both work. Format: Paperback. (shelved 1 time as jewish-mysticism) avg rating —ratings — published Want to Read saving. The controversial Book of Ezekiel nearly didn't make it into the biblical canon, but it has had a lasting impact on both liturgical practice and mystical traditions.

The Book of Ezekiel has always been a problem book. As early as the second century C.E. Like most subjects of Jewish belief, the area of mysticism is wide open to personal interpretation.

Some traditional Jews take mysticism very seriously. Mysticism is an integral part of Chasidic Judaism, for example, and passages from kabbalistic sources are routinely included in traditional prayer books. Other traditional Jews take mysticism. ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: XVIII, Seiten.

Contents: Vol. 1 The Merkabah tradition and the Zoharic tradition. Kabbalah is the most famous form of Jewish mysticism. It flowered in 13th century Spain with the writing of the Zohar, which was originally attributed to the 2nd century sage Shimon bar Yohai.

The Zohar is a commentary on the Torah, concerned primarily with understanding the divine world and its relation to our world. According to. Get this from a library. Understanding mysticism.

[Richard Woods;] -- Understanding mysticism brings together in one volume notable essays on various dimensions of mysticism and the mystical experience by a group of distinguished writers on the subjectback cover. The essays were chosen primarily because of their original contribution toward understanding the phenomenon of mysticism.

Accessibility was also a deciding factor. Many other articles, such as James chapter on mysticism in The Varieties of Religious Experience, Bertrand Russell unique essay Mysticism and Logic and An. Throughout philosophy’s history, some of its most prominent thinkers have drawn inspiration from sources outside of its canon.

It is of my opinion that one of these philosophers, Spinoza, in the first book of his Ethics, borrowed elements of the Kabbalah, to portray his image of first purpose of this piece is to explicate Spinoza’s understanding of God, or Nature Author: Rocco A Astore. "Moshe Idel increasingly is seen as having achieved the eminence of Gershom Scholem in the study of Jewish mysticism.

Ben, his book on the concept of sonship in Kabbalah, is an extraordinary work of scholarship and imaginative surmise. If an intellectual Judaism is to survive, then Idel becomes essential reading, whatever your own spiritual allegiances."-Harold Bloom, 5/5(1).

The Key to Kabbalah will open up the world of Jewish mysticism, giving you your first thirst-quenching sips of the teachings of Pnimiyut HaTorah, the inner dimension of the Torah. This volume provides an overview of the history, principles, content and nature of the Kabbalah and introduces the breadth and depth of the inner-spiritual dimensions Author: Nissan Dovid Dubov.

In his extensive afterword to this new edition of Seasons of Our Joy, Rabbi Waskow addresses the many changes Judaism has undergone in the last thirty years, as feminist Judaism, neo-Chassidic mysticism, eco-Judaism, and Jewish meditation have newly colored our.

at writing a book on Jewish mysticism. The prevailing opinion—among theologians as well as in the mind of the ordinary man--seems to be that Judaism and mysticism stand at the opposite poles of thought, and that, therefore, such a phrase as Jewish mysticism is a glaring and indefensible contradiction in Size: 1MB.

An understanding of the dynamics of print in the production of consideration of the “Jewish book” across different periods and histori-cal contexts.

Looking at three distinct periods in Jewish history—the late in Medieval Jewish Mysticism,” in Transmitting Jewish Traditions: Orality, Textuality, and Cultural Diffusion, Size: 1MB.

Judaism - Judaism - Jewish mysticism: This section deals with the special nature and characteristics of Jewish mysticism, the main lines of its development, and its role in present-day religion and culture. The term mysticism applies to the attempt to establish direct contact, independently of sense perception and intellectual apprehension, with the divine—a reality.

Academic study of Jewish mysticism, especially since Gershom Scholem's Major Trends in Jewish Mysticism (), distinguishes between different forms of mysticism across different eras of Jewish these, Kabbalah, which emerged in 12th-century Europe, is the most well known, but not the only typologic form, or the earliest to previous forms were.

Jewish mysticism differs radically from all other mystic schools. Jewish mysticism (Kabbalah), is based on the public Revelation at Sinai, when the Torah was given to historical event of Sinai attests to the divine source and nature of the Torah and Jewish mysticism.But if the Book Yetsirah gave the impulse to the great books of mediæval Jewish.

p. mysticism, it was eclipsed by them in one great particular. The naïve conception of the mysterious powers of letters and numbers was superseded by the introduction of theological and moral ideas.By the 13th century, Jewish culture was ripe for a new breed of mysticism to flourish.

Arounda Spanish Jew named Moses de Leon penned and began circulating the first copies of the Kabbalah’s most famous book, the Zohar (Book of Splendor) in northern Castile.